West Loop Veterinary Care Dental Health & Spay & Neuter Month
815 W. Randolph
Chicago, IL 60607
P: 312-421-2275
F: 312-829-8387
info@westloopvet.com


PARKING

Parking conveniently located in front of clinic on Randolph. There is street and metered parking on adjacent streets. We are located on the south side of Randolph St., west of Halsted St.


WHEELCHAIR ACCESSIBLE

West Loop offers a folding ramp for easy wheelchair access. Please call ahead so we can put it in place.




HOURS BY APPOINTMENT



MONDAY:  7:30am* - 8:00pm
TUESDAY:  7:30am* - 8:00pm
WEDNESDAY:  7:30am* - 8:00pm
(Closed from 1pm - 3pm for team training)
THURSDAY:  7:30am* - 8:00pm
FRIDAY:  7:30am* - 7:00pm
SATURDAY:  8:00am - 4:00pm
SUNDAY: Closed

*Early intake appointments begin at 7:30am. By request only, please. DVM appointments begin at 8:00am.

Any critically ill or injured pet will be seen immediately


Recent News




MARCH, 2017

DR. GONSKY DISCUSSES HOW TO KEEP YOUR DOG SAFE FROM CANINE INFLUENZA VIRUS (DOG FLU) ON FOX NEWS AT NOON






MARCH, 2017

DOG FLU AWARENESS


At West Loop Veterinary Care, we were pretty much ground zero for the initial outbreak of Canine Influenza Virus, also known as the “dog flu,” when it first broke-out in Chicago in 2015. Thousands of dogs in Chicago became ill. We treated hundreds of them at West Loop Veterinary Care. Fortunately, there is a vaccine to prevent the spread of the disease.

Canine Influenza Virus FAQs

What is Canine Influenza Virus?
Canine Influenza Virus, also known as the “dog flu” is a highly-contagious illness that is easily spread among dogs, and in rare cases, can also sicken cats.

The H3N2 version of the disease was first brought to the Americas in March of 2015, when an outbreak sickened thousands of dogs in Chicago. That strain has since spread to almost every other state. Another version of the disease, H3N8 Canine Influenza Virus, has been found across the country as well.

There is now a vaccine that will protect dogs from both strains of the virus. That’s why the Chicago Veterinary Medical Association wants to remind dog owners about the danger.

How do you know if your pet has the disease? What are the symptoms?
Most dogs exhibit pretty clear symptoms when they have the Canine Influenza Virus, or dog flu. The most common symptoms are:
  • A dry, hacking cough
  • Lethargy
  • Lack of appetite
  • Discharge from their eyes and nose
  • Fever
If your pet shows any of these symptoms, you should see your veterinarian immediately as the illness can become serious.

How is Canine Influenza Virus Spread?
Sadly, the virus is easily spread because it can survive on inanimate objects such a clothing, toys and food bowls for up to 72 hours. At West Loop Veterinary Care, many of our dog clients live in a large condominium or apartment buildings. They can contract the virus from riding in an elevator or even being in a hallway or stairwell where a sick dog has recently been. And, of course, it can be spread at doggy day care, dog parks, dog beaches are other places dogs congregate.

Why is the Canine Influenza Virus so dangerous?
Several things make this virus especially problematic.

Because the H3N2 version of the disease is newer to this country, most dogs have no immunity against it, meaning that almost every dog exposed to the disease will acquire it. Many will need medical care. Some will require hospitalization. A few have died from the disease.

Another reason the disease spreads so easily is that dogs are contagious for a few days before showing symptoms of the disease and for many days after symptoms have dissipated. So, a dog may have the virus and not appear to be sick. In fact, some dogs contract the virus, never appear sick, but are able to spread it to others.

Finally, there are two strains of the virus that can sicken dogs. Fortunately, a new combination vaccine can protect your dog from both versions of the virus.

Is the vaccine appropriate for every dog?
You should always consult with your veterinarian to determine which vaccines are best for your dog based upon its:
  • Age
  • Health
  • Lifestyle

The Canine Influenza Vaccine is most appropriate for dogs that are healthy and social – meaning they interact with other dogs at:
  • Doggy day care
  • Dog parks
  • Dog beaches
  • In buildings where they may be exposed to the same common areas as other dogs.

We have treated hundreds of cases. We know the virus is in our West Loop community. So, we do recommend the vaccine for healthy, social dogs in our community.



FEBRUARY, 2017

SPAY/NEUTER YOUR PUPPY OR KITTEN IN FEBRUARY


Spaying or neutering can improve your pet’s health and behavior. You may not know that West Loop Veterinary Care offers a 20% off Pet Population Control Incentive to encourage spay/neuter. In addition, during the month of February, you also receive an additional $40 discount on your pet’s spay or neuter procedure. Space is limited, so call us today at 312-421-2275.

To be eligible for the discount, your pet’s rabies vaccination must be current with a Cook County Rabies tag on file. If your pet needs a rabies vaccine, we are happy to provide that up to 24 hours in advance of your pet’s spay/neuter procedure at West Loop Veterinary Care.



MARCH 07, 2016

NATURA PET FOOD RECALL UPDATE


We have placed another update on Facebook and Twitter today, but again felt this new information was important for all of our clients to receive as many of our clients pets are on these foods.

Natura Pet has extended their recall to include all branded dry pet food and biscuit/bar/treat products with expiration dates prior to June 10, 2015.
  • Innova
  • EVO
  • Healthwise
  • California Natural
  • Karma
  • Mother Nature

Natura made this decision in part due to a single positive Salmonella test by the FDA on a product manufactured April 3. If you are in possession of any recalled products, please discontinue feeding them to your pets and contact us immediately if you believe your pet has been affected.

Please go to http://www.naturapet.com/ to find instructions on how to request a replacement voucher or refund. For additional inquiries about this recall, contact Natura at 800.224-6123.

If you believe your pet has been affected, please contact us regarding treatment at 312.421.2275. In this, or any situation, we are always here for you and your pet.

As always, should any changes or updates occur with this – or other recalls – we will keep you updated.

Sincerely,
David A. Gonsky, DVM
Medical Director




MARCH 07, 2016

PET FOOD RECALL UPDATE


Natura Pet has extended their recall to include all Natura dry dog, cat and ferret food and treats that have expiration dates on or before March 24, 2015. Natura canned products and Mother Nature biscuits are not affected.

We placed another update on Facebook and Twitter today, but felt this new information was important for all of our clients to receive as many of our clients pets are on these foods.

We have been informed that the company took this precautionary measure because sampling revealed Salmonella in several brands of pet foods.

Salmonella can affect animals eating the products and there is a risk to humans handling contaminated pet products if they have not thoroughly washed their hands after having contact with the products or any surfaces exposed to these products.
 
Below are the cat and dog food/treat products involved in the recall:
  • Innova
  • EVO
  • Healthwise
  • California Natural
  • Karma

If you are in possession of any recalled products, please discontinue feeding them to your pets, and contact your pet food retailer or the respective company to obtain a full refund/replacement. If you believe your pet has been affected, please contact us regarding treatment. In this, or any situation, we are always here for you and your pet.

For additional inquiries about this recall, contact Natura at (800) 224-6123 or go to http://www.naturapet.com

West Loop Veterinary Care is committed to your pet’s health and wellness. Should any changes or updates occur with this – or other recalls – we will keep you updated.

Sincerely,
David A. Gonsky, DVM
Medical Director




MARCH 07, 2016

IVERHART ALERT


In our continual effort to provide the best care for our patients and keep our clients informed, we are sending this email to alert you that Virbac has issued a voluntary recall for six lots of their heartworm preventative, Iverhart Plus Flavored Chewables, due to a failure to meet stability specifications during the life of the product. We placed a Facebook post and Twitter today, but felt this new information was important for all of our clients to receive.

The following lots have been included in the recall:
  • Lot 120076, 120086, and 120856 (Large 51-100 pounds)
  • Lot 120202 (Medium 26-50 pounds)
  • Lot 120196 and 120844 (Small up to 25 pounds)

According to a Virbac, the recalled lots met all of the specifications at the time of their release to distributers, but further product testing showed that the ivermectin potency failed to meet stability specifications during the life of the product.

The recalled lots may not fully protect dogs in the upper third of each weight range against heartworms. At the time of this letter, no heartworm-related adverse reactions or illnesses have been reported.

If you are in possession of any recalled products, please discontinue and contact us immediately for replacement. In this, or any situation, we are always here for you and your pet.

For any other questions or concerns about the Iverhart Plus recall, please contact West Loop Veterinary Care at 312.421.2275. Virbac Technical Services is also available at 1-800-338-3659 ext. 3052.

West Loop Veterinary Care is committed to your pet’s health and wellness. Should any changes or updates occur with this – or other recalls – we will keep you updated.

Sincerely,
David A. Gonsky, DVM
Medical Director




FEBRUARY, 2016

DENTAL HEALTH MONTH


February is Pet Dental Health Month! However, good dental health is so important for your pet's health and well-being that West Loop Veterinary Care promotes it all year long! If you are not sure of the condition of your pet's teeth, please call us to schedule an examination with one of our Doctors, or a complimentary oral health evaluation with one of our Technicians! Our phone number is 312-421-2275. We look forward to seeing you and your pet in the near future!




FEBRUARY, 2016

SPAY/NEUTER YOUR PUPPY OR KITTEN IN FEBRUARY


Spaying or neutering can improve your pet’s health and behavior. You may not know that West Loop Veterinary Care offers a 20% off Pet Population Control Incentive to encourage spay/neuter. In addition, during the month of February, you also receive an additional $40 discount on your pet’s spay or neuter procedure. Space is limited, so call us today at 312-421-2275.

To be eligible for the discount, your pet’s rabies vaccination must be current with a Cook County Rabies tag on file. If your pet needs a rabies vaccine, we are happy to provide that up to 24 hours in advance of your pet’s spay/neuter procedure at West Loop Veterinary Care.




MAY 15, 2015

CANINE INFLUENZA VIRUS UPDATE


We are hoping this will be our last Canine Influenza Update for a while. Of course, we will continue to keep you informed if we learn more or should the situation change.

Here is the current status:
  • Although the situation is improving and we feel that the outbreak is ending, Canine Influenza continues to be present in our area. Each week we continue to see cases of the disease, but far fewer than we had seen at the peak of the outbreak. Additionally, the affected dogs we’ve recently examined have been relatively less sick than our initial patients.
  • Over the past few weeks, virtually all of the dogs we have seen with Canine Influenza symptoms have contracted the disease from locations where dogs congregate in groups.
  • For the next few weeks, we continue to encourage clients to avoid socialization between dogs that don’t live together as this disease is spread by close contact between animals.
  • Anyone in contact with multiple dogs from multiple homes should continue to change clothes or thoroughly disinfect after contact with each dog and before coming in contact with the next dog or their environment.
  • Groomers should thoroughly disinfect their equipment and kennels between each dog. Please allow 10 minutes after disinfecting to allow the items to air dry before exposing another dog to them.
  • Based upon the latest research, the recommendation for isolation has changed and any dog that is believed to have Canine Influenza Virus should be isolated from other animals for 21 days. Previously, it was 14 days.

With the approaching Memorial Day weekend, there will be a lot of dogs who are boarded while their “parents” travel. We will have a better idea about how extensive the Canine Influenza problem continues to be in our area about 7-10 days after the holiday. If you are traveling in the meantime, consider asking family and friends to care for your dog if possible.

If there is no significant increase in the number of Canine Influenza Virus cases between now and June 1, we will know that things have improved enough to sound the “all-clear.” It will certainly be a great way to start off our summer!

In the meanwhile be cautious and to the extent possible, avoid boarding and daycare facilities, dog parks, dog beaches, etc . Hopefully it won’t be too long before we can all return to normal – and support those boarding, daycare, and grooming businesses who were affected more than others because they took a responsible approach and did all they could to help protect our pets.

As mentioned at the beginning of this message, we hope this will be our last Canine Influenza Virus update until we are able to report that things have gotten as back to normal as possible.

We hope you and your pets enjoy a safe and happy start to summer!

Sincerely,

Your Health Care Team at West Loop Veterinary Care




APRIL 14, 2015

DOG FLU IN CHICAGO LIKELY ORIGINATED IN ASIA, SCIENTISTS SAY


Click here for the full article




APRIL 14, 2015

VETS: CURRENT VACCINE MAY NOT HELP DOG FLU STRAIN


We did not see the news story as we are busy caring for patients, however in reading below would like to clarify for our CAT owners that a vaccine for cats against "dog flu" DOES NOT EXIST. If it did our opinion at this time would be that there is no benefit in vaccinating cats for this disease as they are generally not as social with other, unknown cats, nor do they congregate and gather like dogs. Thus spread between cats would be significantly less likely.

Click here for the full article



APRIL 13, 2015

CHICAGO-AREA DOG FLU EPIDEMIC CAUSED BY STRAIN NEVER SEEN BEFORE IN NORTH AMERICA


Fox news story from last night:
http://www.myfoxchicago.com/story/28793379/chicago-dog-flu-strain-never-seen-north-america

Please call us if you have any questions or concerns about your dog (or cat!).



APRIL 10, 2015

CANINE INFLUENZA VIRUS UPDATE


As you are aware, West Loop Veterinary Care was one of the first, if not the first clinic in Chicago to correctly diagnose Canine Influenza Virus (CIV) as the cause for significant increases in canine respiratory illness that Chicago began experiencing in mid to late March.

Since that time, we have continually been monitoring the Canine Influenza Virus outbreak. At long last, there may be some good news! Over the last few days our doctors have noticed a significant decrease in new suspected CIV cases. We are cautiously optimistic that the worst of this outbreak in the West Loop and surrounding areas may be over.

This conclusion is based upon our current caseload as well as telephone communications with our new and existing clients. While we cannot speak for all of Chicago, we suspect that new cases will continue to occur in our area, but at a lower rate. A small spike towards the end of next week is also anticipated after those who have left town or those whose dogs have been boarded return from their holiday getaways.

Though we feel things are improving, we nonetheless remain vigilant. We have had our flooring professionally cleaned and continue to use appropriate sanitation, immediate isolation of all respiratory cases, and utilization of protective gear to keep all of our patients healthy. We continue to urge dog owners to remain vigilant and help prevent the spread of the canine influenza. To keep your own dog safe, continue to avoid social “group” situations such as daycare, dog parks, and grooming.

To help keep other dogs safe, we strongly encourage you not to expose dogs from outlying suburbs or other states to your "Chicago dog" as twenty percent (20%) of dogs exposed to CIV will show no symptoms, yet can shed the virus for up to fourteen days. Dogs from outside of Chicago are discouraged from visiting during this time as they risk both infection and bringing the virus back to other dogs when they return home.

Vaccination for Canine Influenza is available at West Loop Veterinary Care and recommended at this time. The vaccination requires a booster 2-4 weeks after the initial vaccination and will not prevent illness in a dog that has recently been exposed. It is considered both safe and effective.

Symptoms of canine influenza to be alert for include: coughing or a "honking" in the throat, lethargy, loss of appetite, fever, as well as a runny nose with mucus secretions.

As we’ve mentioned in our past communications as well as observed, the vast majority of infected dogs will recover with supportive care, including antibiotics, cough medications, and fluid therapy when necessary. In a small number of cases, canine influenza can progress to pneumonia.

We encourage you to follow updates and review our prior posts on Facebook. Please do not hesitate to call our office should you have any additional concerns regarding CIV or general questions about your dog’s health.

Sincerely,
The Health Care Team at West Loop Veterinary Care



APRIL 3, 2015

CANINE INFLUENZA VIRUS UPDATE


The local media is reporting that there have been fatalities from the current Canine Influenza Virus (CIV) outbreak. While we are very pleased that WLVC patients have not experienced any fatalities, sadly the reports are accurate. It is important you know that the number of dogs who have died secondary to the effects of CIV is extremely small compared to the suspected number of infected dogs. Symptoms of Canine Influenza include lethargy, lack of appetite, coughing and hacking, fever, and sometimes nasal discharge.

We have been experiencing some of our patients take anywhere from three to up to seven days to “turn the corner.” Almost all of our patients who were placed on appropriate antibiotic therapy have not developed pneumonia. While influenza signs can linger for up to a week, pneumonia causes a worsening of those signs. Differentiating signs of pneumonia from those of influenza are a general deterioration in health, change in character of coughing to a soft, moist cough, and usually a green nasal discharge. At home, a rectal thermometer may be used to monitor for temperatures exceeding 102 to 102.5 degrees at rest.

Fortunately, in the cases of pneumonia we have diagnosed, aggressive treatment with fluids, antibiotics, and supportive care has led to positive outcomes and dogs going back home to their families.

We continue to encourage dog owners to seek treatment or at minimum alert their Veterinarian at the first signs of Canine Influenza symptoms. Early intervention with appropriate supportive care is important to recovery.

To help limit the spread of Canine Influenza Virus during the upcoming holiday weekend, we strongly encourage you not to expose dogs from outlying suburbs or other states to your "Chicago dog." Twenty percent (20%) of dogs exposed to CIV will show no symptoms and not appear ill, yet may still shed the virus for up to 14 days. Dogs not from Chicago are discouraged from visiting during this time.

Avoiding "group" situations such as daycare, dog parks, and grooming is also encouraged to help limit the spread of CIV and keep your dog safe. Vaccination for this disease is available and is both safe and effective.

We encourage you to follow timely updates and review our prior posts on Facebook and call our office should you have any additional questions or concerns.

Sincerely,
The Health Care Team at West Loop Veterinary Care



APRIL 3, 2015

REGIONAL CANINE INFLUENZA VIRAL OUTBREAK FEARED


People and their pets are on the move this holiday weekend, and that has Chicago veterinarians David Gonsky, DVM of West Loop Veterinary Care (www.WestLoopVet.com) and Natalie Marks, DVM of Blum Animal Hospital (www.BlumVet.com) very concerned. Chicago is currently in the midst of an unprecedented Canine Influenza Virus (CIV) outbreak. This highly contagious virus is causing hundreds of dogs to become ill with coughing, fever, loss of appetite, and even pneumonia. Now, these pets are “going home” to see their family and friends for the holiday and may spread the disease to other parts of the country.

Dr. Gonsky and Dr. Marks, two prominent Chicago area veterinarians, have treated too many dogs affected by Canine Influenza. “These poor dogs are very, very sick. They feel terrible and it’s heartbreaking to see,” said Dr. Marks. “Many of these dogs have developed pneumonia and required hospitalization as a complication to this illness.” Both of their clinics have seen up to 20 dogs with symptoms of the disease each day for the past few weeks and don’t expect those numbers to change in the near future.

What worries them both is dogs traveling to other parts of the country. Dr. Gonsky and Dr. Marks have already spoken to clients in Dubuque, St Louis, Indianapolis, and Chicago’s suburbs who have travelled home with their pets. “This terrifies us as each one of these dogs could spread the Canine Influenza virus and infect dogs in the areas they travel to over the holiday,” said Dr. Gonsky. “Even dogs that look perfectly healthy may have the disease and are able to spread it. The conditions are right to create a regional outbreak of Canine Influenza.”

Up to 20% of exposed and infected dogs may show absolutely no symptoms; however, they can shed this highly contagious respiratory disease for up to fourteen days.

Dog owners who are travelling from Chicago are advised to keep their dogs separate from all other dogs, including those of other family members. If exposure occurs, the other dog should remain separate from other dogs for approximately 3 weeks. Dog owners from other regions are encouraged not to bring their dog with them if they are travelling to Chicago. If they must, they should avoid all areas where dogs may gather such as dog parks, dog beaches, groomers, dog daycare and kennels.

If any dogs become ill with signs of Canine Influenza, which mimics “kennel cough,” but in a more severe form, dog owners are strongly encouraged to advise the local veterinarians that their dog may have Canine Influenza. This will allow the veterinarian to take appropriate safety precautions while attempting to diagnose the disease, appropriately treat the pet, alert their colleagues, and prevent inadvertent spread of the disease. Veterinarians are encouraged to be extra vigilant over the next 2-3 weeks when clients contact them about dogs with respiratory signs. “We have reached out to the American, Illinois State, and Chicago Veterinary Medical Associations, vaccine manufacturers and even our friends to help us spread the word and prevent more dogs from becoming ill, “ said Dr. Gonsky. “Nobody should have to go through what we are going through here in Chicago.”

Signs of CIV include:
  • A dry hacking cough
  • Coughing up a white, foamy phlegm.
  • Lethargy
  • Vomiting
  • Lack of appetite
  • Runny nose
  • Rapid breathing

Pet owners can help prevent spread of the disease by immediately isolating sick pets. They should contact their veterinarian before taking their dog in for care and let the veterinarian know that Canine Influenza is a possibility. The veterinarian may ask that the dog be kept in the car until it is ready to be seen.

There are vaccinations available that may help curb the spread of the disease. Dr. Gonsky and Dr. Marks recommend that dog owners consult their veterinarian to determine if their dogs should receive the Canine Influenza vaccine and the Bordetella (Kennel Cough) vaccine. Even dogs who would not typically be candidates for these vaccinations may benefit from them due to the widespread nature of this illness.



MARCH 27, 2015

MEDICAL NEWS: CANINE FLU ALERT


Doctors at West Loop Veterinary Care have been monitoring an ongoing outbreak of canine respiratory infections in the Chicago area. We have worked closely with Cornell University College of Veterinary Medicine as well as Merck and Zoetis pharmaceutical companies, to identify the health issues involved. We have tested more than 30 dogs and just received the results of the first five tests. Four of those tests came back positive for canine influenza and a fifth is suspect for the disease. While there may be multiple causes behind the current respiratory infections outbreak, this is very likely the key factor.

Canine influenza is a virus mutated from horses (H3N8) and first noted in 2004. It is highly infectious among dogs. Humans are not affected. Not all infected dogs will display symptoms, but between 50-80% will show symptoms including:
  • coughing or "honking" in the throat
  • lethargy
  • fever
  • loss of appetite
  • runny nose and mucus secretions

The vast majority of infected dogs will recover with supportive care, including antibiotics and fluid therapy. In a small number of cases, canine influenza can progress to pneumonia. Pneumonia is a more serious infection, but with proper care most patients can be expected to recover.

A vaccination for canine influenza is available at West Loop Veterinary Care. It is safe and effective. We currently recommend the vaccination for dogs who:
  • are not currently symptomatic
  • expect to be boarded or attend dog daycare in the near future
  • are social/physically interactive with other dogs
  • can expect exposure to other dogs in the near future

Vaccination will not help a dog that has already been exposed, and it is not immediately effective. We recommend that dogs be kept in minimal contact with potentially infected dogs for 2-3 weeks after vaccination.

Due to the size and infectious nature of the current outbreak, dogs that regularly visit dog parks, kennels, daycares, and other "dog-social" environments in Chicago have likely already been exposed. Vaccination will not make an immediate, short-term difference in their health. However, this outbreak should remind us all of the importance of keeping vaccinations up-to-schedule.

Dog owners with dogs that are highly-social (meaning they visit dog parks, dog beaches, doggie-day-care and other places where they are likely to come in contact with other dogs) should strongly consider having their pets vaccinated for canine influenza virus going forward.

The situation is continuing to develop and we will keep you posted as we learn more.
Please feel free to reach out to our staff if you have any questions or concerns about your pet’s health.


MARCH 12, 2015

DOG DIETARY FATIGUE?


QUESTION:
My four-year-old Terrier mix seems to be tiring of his food. He's been on the same brand of high-quality dry food since I got him when he was a puppy, and we rotate through three flavors. Lately, he's stopped getting excited around mealtime and sometimes even needs a little bit of coaxing to start eating. He's fine as soon as he gets going, so I don't think it's an appetite thing. Is it possible he's just sick of eating the same food everyday? If I do want to mix it up and switch to a new brand, how do I go about making the transition?

ANSWER:
This is an important question, and one I hear often, especially for our smaller breed dog patients. Here are some things to try:

First, your dog may be less excited about eating simply because he’s full. Sometimes we unknowingly feed a bit too much and over time our dogs become heavier. In that case cut back his portions a little. Within a few days, he should be eating more enthusiastically.

If the problem isn’t too many calories, the next step, together with your vet, is to rule out any medical issues. For example, oral health conditions such as diseased gums or damaged teeth can be painful and cause an otherwise good eater to slow down because their mouth hurts. If your dog is underweight, there could be a number of underlying medical conditions, especially if he has soft stool or vomiting.

If there are no physical issues, let’s remember that Terrier breeds are both smart and persistent. They can quickly adapt and learn ways to train us pet parents if we’re not careful! Specifically, your dog may have become accustomed to you actively feeding him and this learned behavior has become his routine. Stop coaxing him and give him a reasonable amount of time to eat. If he doesn’t finish, throw away the food or save it for the next meal. Missing part or all of a meal won’t hurt him. (So don’t feel guilty!) But it will help him understand how feeding time will work in the future. If this proves to be the issue, he’ll soon be back to eating eagerly on his own.

Now let’s talk about “variety”. Many dogs are happy eating the same food their entire lives, but it may be your little guy needs a transition. It’s very important to make dietary changes gradually. First, try mixing in a little wet canned food, ideally the same brand as the dry food or kibble you’re using now. Mix the wet in well with the dry food (one part wet to three parts dry) and then feed. Perhaps that’s all the stimulation he’ll need. If he instead picks out the wet morsels and then looks to you for more, don’t give in or you’ll just create another bad habit. Over the course of a couple weeks, gradually remove the wet food until he is back on just the dry diet. Or, you may find that just a little bit of the wet food in his diet will be enough to stimulate his appetite.

If he still doesn’t eat consistently and you think he is truly bored with the flavor, try mixing in a new brand of dry food. To prevent any digestion issues, start at about 20% new food and over the course of 5-14 days (depending upon how well your dog tolerates diet changes) add about 10-20% of the new kibble daily and remove that same percentage of the previous food.

Remember to work with your vet to rule out any underlying medical issues. If you go through this suggested process, I’m sure your little guy will be back to eating happily once again.

Good luck!
David Gonsky, DVM


©Copyright 2016. Dr. David A. Gonsky. All Rights Reserved.